• LOCATION 5 | Historical Pubs of London: A Tipply Trundle Through Liquid History

    Cannon Bollards

    Cannon Bollards on London audio tour Historical Pubs of London: A Tipply Trundle Through Liquid History

    After turning left into Bride Lane you'll notice that the street is just wide enough for a horse and cart to clip-clop its way around the medieval city. Prior to the Great Fire of London in 1666, buildings would often be made entirely from wood and lean out into the street creating narrow tunnel-like thoroughfares, that provided the perfect structure for fire to leap from roof to roof unabated.

    Whoa! Let's stop a moment to enjoy the collection of five street bollards on the left hand side.

    Look closely and they appear to look like upright military cannons, replete with a cannonball welded into each muzzle.

    Legend has it that when the British Navy beat the French in battle, they would steal the cannons as war trophies and place them vertically on street corners across the city. Whisper it quietly but everywhere you look in London it seems to say "We beat the French!". 



    Rule Britannia indeed!

    Let's follow the street up and around to the right and whilst we walk I'll tell you another salty seafaring story. 



    Admiral Nelson, he of Nelson's column fame, was killed at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. To preserve his rotting body on the long voyage home they plonked him into a giant keg of naval rum. But with life on the high seas being really rather thirsty work, the crew were known to procure straws made of macaroni and drink the barrel completely dry. Apparently the consensus generally being that the rum had a rather full-bodied flavour! Mmm mmm!

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Historical Pubs of London: A Tipply Trundle Through Liquid History