• LOCATION 45 | A Guide to Galway by Bike: Hidden Gems, Haunting Stories and Stunning Vistas

    Salthill Village

    Salthill Village on Galway audio tour A Guide to Galway by Bike: Hidden Gems, Haunting Stories and Stunning Vistas

    Keep going towards our final stop.

    The village of Salthill experienced a great deal of development with boarding houses and pubs springing up along the strip in the latter part of the 19th and early 20th century. Part of this development involved the construction of the Church of Christ the King in 1936 at Monksfield, the site of an early Christian site. There are also remnants of a large ringfort on Daly’s Fort Road to your right, now incorporated into the park. During medieval times the Gaelic Irish were restricted from entering the walled city, however, the original inhabitants didn’t move far. This is evident by the names of the businesses here today, for example, the O’Connor’s who own several businesses here including O'Connors Pub which is decorated with many traditional household implements from yesteryear with nightly music sessions during the summer.

    In 1902, Toft’s amusements would operate in the park mentioned for the summer season, operating as Toft’s Steam Horses and Moving Picture Show. In the 1920s a disused airplane hangar was acquired and erected at the end of the park, The Salthill development rented the Hangar from Galway City Council and it became The Pavilion Ballroom, where many romances blossomed. The revenue was invested in further infrastructure such as the amphitheater and diving boards at Blackrock which is our last stop on the tour.

    Keep cycling.

A Guide to Galway by Bike: Hidden Gems, Haunting Stories and Stunning Vistas